Welcome - This is a Social Enterprise Business It aims to help potters and ceramic artists to become better known, to sell their work, to fill their courses and to provide a window into this fantastic world of 3D art!

New Members

Work for Sale

Ceramics by Brian Holland at Studiopottery.co.uk

Brian Holland

Ceramics by Eddie Curtis at Studiopottery.co.uk

Eddie Curtis

Upcoming events

Argilla Italia 2014 at Argilla Italia 5th - 7th September 2014 International Fair in Faenza, Italy expecting 180 entrants. Tony Laverick and Jeremy Nichols will be showing
Vivace with ceramic art at Gravelly Barn Gallery 19th - 21st September 2014 Art inspired by music - includes new ceramic art from Carolyn Genders
International Chawan expo project at Teochew Building, Singapore 6th - 14th September 2014 Each participant will exhibit 3 Chawan. Selection of Chawan is highly based on the artwork seen through the photos from submission.
Shima Kara Shima E - ceramic art at Leach Pottery 13th September to 12th October, 2014 An exhibition of collaborative work by Ashley Howard and Risa Ohgi 

Recently added Courses

Seymour Road Studios - Weekly Pottery courses - Fran Tristram - 8th September to 3rd December, 2014
Master all the hand-building techniques making pots by pinching, coiling and slab-building, together with introduction to decoration techniques using texture, slips, oxides and glazes.
Working with Clay - Jude Jelfs - 25th September 2014 to 3rd December, 2014
Jude Jelfs is a potter and bronze worker who makes figurative ceramics in earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. 
Advanced Raku Workshop with John Evans - 5th - 8th June 2015
The ĎAdvanced' workshop for those familiar with burnishing and the use of Terra Sig incorporates a wide range of  fuming and smoking techniques (including a pit-fire)  and will be over the Spring Bank Holiday weekend. Book early Fills up very quickly! 
Make ceramic spoons. Claire Ireland - 14th December 2014 - 8th June 2015
Learn how to make ceramic spoons using hand building and surface decoration techniques.

Archive for December, 2011

Campaign to Save the Wedgwood Museum

The Campaign to Save the Wedgwood Museum received the shocking news that the UNESCO recognised archive of international importance is not held in trust and can be dispersed and sold to meet wholly disproportionate £135m Pension Fund liabilities.

Read the Press release from the Pension Protection Fund (PPF) lawyershere. Stoke-upon-Trent MP Hon. Dr Tristram Hunt MP is meeting with Government Ministers on December 20th to discuss the plight of the Museum.

The Battle continues Рcontinued political lobbying is essential: write to your MP to drive home how important this unique collection is to you.

Campaign leader Alison Wedgwood:¬†“We will begin a fund raising campaign in the new year, asking the government for urgent support, and seeking support from the Art Fund, Heritage Lottery Fund and as many generous philanthropists as we can cajole. This collection is not leaving Staffordshire without a fight!”


Write to you MP, Join our Supporters roll to declare your support and to be kept up to date with the Campaign: help to Save Wedgwood for the Nation.

I was shocked to hear of this disgusting decision РI presume under the existing law the courts had little option!  I have written to my local MP seeking support and would ask that all who read this article do the same Рeither to their MP or if outside the UK, Direct to the Prime Minister, the Rt. Hon. David Cameron.

Please also Join the supporters group above.

Here is a copy of my letter:

Dear Nicholas Soames,‚Ä®I run a major website for ceramic art, www.studiopottery.co.uk with an audience of some 25000 per month, with several hundred ceramic artist members. I have watched the unfolding saga surrounding the Wedgwood Museum with consternation and sadness. In essence, as I understand it, because a few museum staff were linked with the company the whole of the assets of the museum can be claimed and sold for the benefit of the old group pension scheme deficit. This ‘loophole’ in the law has been confirmed by the court this week. ‚Ä®The result is that this archive of International importance, recognised by UNESCO can now be split up and sold off to meet the group pension fund liabilities.



http://savewedgwood.blogspot.com/2011/12/decision-collection-can-be-dispersed.html



Destruction of this unique collection and archive, which was always intended to be held in trust for perpetuity would be a National DISGRACE.

Both personally and on behalf of Studiopottery.co.uk we seek your support in finding a way that this unique collection can be saved for the nation and for future generations.



Yours sincerely,

Stephen Dee


Founder and Director
Studiopottery.co.uk

VOYAGES OF DISCOVERY: De Morgans and the Sea: 3 February – 25 August 2012

Curated in conjunction with Arts and Crafts property, National Trust Standen, De Morgans and the Sea gives visitors the opportunity to explore maritime influences in the work of the De Morgans. The theme of the sea was a major source of inspiration for both William De Morgan’s Arts and Crafts ceramics and his wife Evelyn’s paintings. Medieval galleons manned by sailors on the lookout for giant fish, dolphins and sea monsters form part of William De Morgan’s quirky cast of characters.  Evelyn’s paintings of mythological subjects such as Ariadne (looking more stoical than distraught after being abandoned on the island of Naxos by her lover Theseus) or her depictions of Hans Christian Anderson’s much adored little mermaid reinterpret these classic tales for a new audience.

As well as drawing inspiration from the sea, much of De Morgan‚Äôs work was destined to travel the waves themselves, as commissions for the P&O shipping line. The superlative Galleon tile panel, designed for the P&O ship¬†S.S.Malta¬†in 1895, will be exhibited alongside key pieces from the De Morgan collection, including a spectacular moonlight lustre punch bowl depicting fanciful fish which represents the pinnacle of De Morgan‚Äôs technical prowess, and a very rare, early seahorse tile whose production techniques mirror the matt quality of Morris and Co. tiles. Among Evelyn‚Äôs exhibited works are the nude male figures of¬†Phosphorous and Hesperus, which, imbued with potent sexual symbolism in the form of phallic torches and conch shells, caused scandal and controversy when first exhibited, and the allegorical ‚ÄėS.O.S‚Äô¬†with its symbolic sea monsters representing evil and death.

The De Morgan Centre, 38 West Hill, London, SW18 1RX.    Phone: 020 8871 1144

 

 

Stirring the Swarm Exhibition by Anna Collette Hunt – to 29 January 2012

Stirring the Swarm is a ceramic installation that tells a curiously dark tale inspired by the collection of Entomology in the Natural History collection at Wollaton Hall, Nottingham. The exhibition lures viewers into this macabre story as they find these enchanted insects, gathered in the Castle after their journey from Wollaton Hall.

Anna Collette Hunt’s ceramics aim to rekindle a forgotten, childlike sense of curiosity and delight. Scenes from her Wall Dish series of intricately detailed and decorated plates, speak of historic grandeur and past traditions, whilst closer inspection reveals a sometimes sinister undertone. Each piece has a story to tell, tempting the viewer’s imagination to assign personal narrative to the assembly of images, forms and textures within the work. Stirring the Swarm develops this notion further by creating a fictional narrative that viewers can stumble into and follow, tapping in to the imagination of the artist. The exhibition has the atmosphere of a Brothers Grimm-style gothic fairytale, intended to stir imagination and incite curiosity, whilst fleeting and disjointed sounds add to the unease and discomfort of the installation.

A static swarm of 10,000 handmade ceramic insects infest the South Hall stairwell at Nottingham Castle, each one unique and strikingly beautiful. Dry, dingy creatures cling lifelessly to the walls, frozen in the viewer‚Äôs sight, alongside more dazzling ‚Äėspecimens‚Äô that sparkle and shine with rich glazes and lustres.¬† Many also have missing limbs or wings to reflect their ancient and delicate condition – or perhaps they mutated during their escape, sprouting extra heads or wings: evolution and magic transforming the swarm into a new lifeform. The rich palette of gold, green, blue, brown and cream pays homage to the flocked wall paper of Wollaton Hall, the pattern of which has even sprouted on some of their wings.

The exhibition is a result of Anna’s preoccupation with historic houses. After reoccurring visits to Wollaton Hall, she was repeatedly drawn to Entomology, particularly to the fragility of the aging beetles within the collection and by the possible stories that could be crafted from them.  Stirring the Swarm was made in several stages:  as Hunt created the original models and their moulds, then a team of assistants made and glazed the 10,000 individual elements. Some insects have a trickle of gold lustre, which references the traditional technique of presenting insects in museum collections by pinning each one to a board. This particular aspect has also fallen into the story, where the enchanted beetles bleed gold from their wounds.

 

Venue: Nottingham Castle Museum and Art Gallery, Off Friar Lane, Off Maid Marian Way, Nottingham. NG1 6EL

Pot-Easel: Display Stand

I recently tried out a ‘Pot-Easel’ and must say I was quite impressed. It is a sturdy quality construction – simple to assemble – made from solid oak and very effective for displaying plates and chargers without damage. It would be equally useful for the private collector or for Gallery and Museum use.

  

I set out below the makers Press Release which covers a lot of background and detail:

Pot-Easel  is a unique display stand developed primarily for studio pottery and ceramics. Made from solid oak, the product was invented by Paul Sansom and Freda Wade, who obtained a design registration in 2010 prior to the launch at Earth and Fire in the same year.

This simple design took several months to perfect in terms of display, support, material choice and function. The traditional oak construction compliments the potters work and the unique sliding bridge gives a versatility to allow 3 size settings.  The central pole ensures a low centre of gravity and excellent support. Since the launch the product has received many good reviews from Potters and collectors alike encouraging the makers to add new lines to the range. Customers have also found many other uses for Pot Easel ranging from supporting menus and books to pictures and icons.

Further developments now include a small size for use on shelves and a large version that takes the wide circumference platters, bowls and heaviest chargers. Two colour variations are available- natural oak and black [burnt oak].

Pot Easel can be purchased at some of the ceramic shows in the UK, galleries or direct from the makers www.poteasel.co.uk .

 For further information contact Paul Sansom on 07773817513 or email paul.sansom@poteasel.co.uk

Out of the Earth – Chris Carter & Martin Green: until 14 January 2012

Renowned potter Chris Carter and archaeologist Martin Green share their fascination with the prehistoric past of Cranborne Chase.  Through art and artefact, they reveal a story of the humans that occupied the landscape before history was written.

Out of the Earth explores a dialogue between artist and archaeologist as they respond to the objects excavated from flint-rich soils of Cranborne Chase.  Artefacts from Martin’s own museum, which displays the finds he has discovered over the years, will be on display alongside Chris’s artwork and objects from Salisbury Museum and Wiltshire Heritage Museum.  Together, the objects describe and uncover the imprints left by farming, community and ritual activities in the past.

Chris and Martin describe themselves as ‚Äėsons of the soil‚Äô, both having been raised on farms in the countrysides of Warwickshire and Dorset.¬† They met following a BBC4 radio show ‚ÄėOpen Country‚Äô which featured Down Farm on Cranborne Chase.¬† Martin had been excavating there since he inherited it in 1979 and Chris‚Äôs interest in the Chase landscape soon developed into a passion for exploring it through his art.

The exhibition shows new developments in Chris’s work and is itself a testimony to the continuing influence of prehistoric people on us today as their artistry, communities and ritual activities are re-discovered through archaeology.  Chris describes the way he searches for his pots in the clay as akin to the archaeologist’s search for an object in the earth.  Cranborne Chase has encouraged his art to take new routes which have seen him sculpting from flint and creating 2D collage works.  A deep-seated influence of the landscape and farming is apparent in his work; his pots suggest the sinuous twist of the plough and the symmetry of the stone axe, whilst the surface textures reflect the processes of people and nature on the landscape.

Both pot and artefact have a power and contemplative quality that makes Out of the Earth an exhibition not to be missed.  Here, the passion for the Cranborne landscape and for the people who lived on and moulded it, is deep-seated, inherent and heartfelt.  The stories revealed are told by two people who know the landscape intimately, both inside and out, and can tell those stories with an authority and understanding that cannot be disputed.

At: salisbury Museum, The King’s House, 65, The Close, Salisbury, SP1 2EN