Welcome - This is a Social Enterprise Business It aims to help potters and ceramic artists to become better known, to sell their work, to fill their courses and to provide a window into this fantastic world of 3D art!

New Members

Work for Sale

Ceramics by Lesley Martin at Studiopottery.co.uk

Lesley Martin

Ceramics by Patricia Shone at Studiopottery.co.uk

Patricia Shone

Upcoming events

Open Studio - Mark Griffiths at Pottery, The, Culmington 2nd - 3rd December 2017 Pots from the kiln and a clearance of older stock
The Annual Christmas Pot Sale - Kochevet Bendavid at Open Studio Kochevet Bendavid 26th November 2017 - 3rd December 2017 A rare opportunity to meet Kochevet at her studio and see new work
Winter Open studio - Chris Keenan - ceramics at Open Studio in Southwark, london 30th November to 3rd December, 2017 Good opportunity to see where Chris works! and buy some of his new work. PV Friday 30 November from 5.00pm to 8.00pm
Peter Hayes - Open Studio at Open Studio, Bath 25th November 2017 to 3rd December, 2017 Chance to meet Peter Hayes and see/buy his new work

Recently added Courses

Adult Summer Pottery Course with Mohamed Hamid - 28th August to 1st September, 2017
Hand building, throwing and decorating techniques! (previous week Fully booked!)
Residential Pottery Courses in France with Sylph Baier - 14th May to 14th October, 2017
It is mainly throwing based and would suit students with some throwing experience but other techniques can also be covered as well as glazing and firing in electric and gas reduction kiln
Experimental Ceramic Workshop - Claire Ireland - 18th September to 20th November, 2017
This course will explore the use of clay in an experimental way 
Potters Wheel Courses and Workshops at Eastnor Pottery - 5th August to 2nd December, 2018
Escape to the country and spend a relaxing day or weekend learning how to make pottery on the potter's wheel.

Archive for January, 2012

Craft Potters Charitable Trust : Auction – Funding the Future

Open now!  The silent auction will close at 6pm on 11th of February 2012.The highest bid on each bid item will be deemed that of the successful buyer unless the reserve price has not been reached.

Bid at:   www.fundingthefutureauction.blogspot.com

An auction of contemporary studio ceramics raising funds for the Craft Potters Charitable Trust:

International Texas Teapot Tournament! January 14th – 29th

Ian Rylatt is taking part in this event in Houston Heights, Texas.  His teapot won The Memorial Prize, or overall 2nd place!  the show is on until 29 January at : 249B W 19th Street in the Houston Heights. Well done Ian – great to see!! See more of Ian’s work on our website.

.Ian Rylatt - Lamp Teapot

For Potters/Makers looking for New Events to apply for in 2012

You should check out our

Submission Deadlines page!

There are plenty of possible events/exhibitions to apply for and we are adding new ones, whenever we hear of them, throughout the year.

They are both in Britain:

South Devon Ceramics Festival; London: A Celebration; Craft Open Exhibition 2012 and more….

and elsewhere in the World:

Panorama, Ceramics Market, Switzerland; Argilla Italia 2012; International ceramics market in Hohr-Grenzhausen and more…

Have a look from time to time!

 

Issue 13 Interpreting Ceramics

Issue 13 of Interpreting Ceramics is now published online and it contains two articles that focus on aspects of ceramics in Wales.

The first of these is entitled ‘Llanelly Pottery – A Welsh Metonym’. The author, Kathy Talbot, discusses the ways that the pottery manufactured in this South Wales town during the nineteenth and early twentieth century came to stand not just for the town itself, but also for a particular kind of Welsh identity which drew on a strong sense of nostalgia for its past.

The second article by Jennifer Lewis on ‘Gaudy Welsh China’, draws on textual and visual evidence to explore aspects of the history, technology, design, decoration and interpretation of a ware that is also known as ‘Swansea Cottage’. Lewis’ account makes a major contribution to an understanding of a distinctive type of ceramics that is still better known and more widely collected in the USA than in the UK.

The third article in Issue 13 is by Laura Gray and is an exploration of the ways that contemporary ceramicists have made and displayed work in response to what the author calls ‘the distinctive hybrid domestic-museum environment offered by former homes such as Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge, High Cross House in Devon and Blackwell Arts and Craft House in the Lake District’. Martina Margetts and Moira Vincentelli have provided book reviews for this issue.

www.interpretingceramics.com

Eva Zeisel – November 13 1906 – December 30 2011

 

Eva Zeisel: November 13, 1906 – December 30, 2011

 

Eva
photo credit: www.brooklynrail.org 

The ceramics world lost yet another giant as 2011 came to a close. A little over a month after turning 105, Eva Zeisel, designer of some of the 20th century’s most seductive and iconic objects passed away. Born, Eva Amalia Striker, into a prosperous and assimilated Jewish family in Budapest, Hungary in 1906, she entered the Royal Academy of Fine Arts at age 17. Eva’s mother encouraged her to enter an apprenticeship with a traditional artisan out of concern for her ability to make a living as a painter. She soon became the first woman member of traditional Hungarian Guild of Chimney Sweeps, Oven Makers, Roof Tilers, Well Diggers & Potters. One year after establishing a studio on her family’s property her work was displayed at the Philadelphia Sesquicentennial, where she won an honorable mention. She began designing in the Kispester Factory in Budapest, but soon found work in Germany which promised to engage her in all phases of industrial design and production of ceramic wares. This established Zeisel as the first woman to move ceramic arts into mass production. In 1932, inspired by new artistic and social movements taking place in Russia, she embarked on a vacation which led to expanded opportunities in industrial design. Young Eva took a position helping to modernize Russia’s ceramic industry and traveled throughout the country to coordinate efforts to create a central manufactory. She was soon transferred to Leningrad and then appointed Artistic Director for the Porcelain and Glass Industries for all of Russia. In 1936 she was imprisoned in the NKVD prison for 16 months, accused of plotting against Stalin. Among other things, it was suggested she had hidden swastikas in porcelain designs and hidden guns for an assassination attempt. Close friend Arthur Koestler, who mentioned her in the dedication for his novel Darkness at Noon (1940) drew from Zeisel’s experiences of solitary confinement to formulate his harrowing tale of totalitarian rule in Russia. In her work, Zeisel remained committed to the Bauhaus dictum that the highest form of industry is to mass produce works of art. Yet the aura of the hand, the body and the animal spirit embodied in her designs transcended their means of mechanical reproduction. Incorporating the profiles of belly buttons and baby’s bottoms to invite tactile experience and the open mouths of birds to dispense cream, Zeisel expanded the language of form and function in mass produced wares. Through her life and work, Zeisel not only inspired successive generations of ceramic artists, she also presaged tendencies of hybridization in art, design and craft that have a very 21st century feel.


mugshot of Eva Zeisel

Obituary courtesy of NCECA