Welcome - This is a Social Enterprise Business It aims to help potters and ceramic artists to become better known, to sell their work, to fill their courses and to provide a window into this fantastic world of 3D art!

New Members

Work for Sale

Ceramics by Alvin F. Irving at Studiopottery.co.uk

Alvin F. Irving

Ceramics by Liz Mathews at Studiopottery.co.uk

Liz Mathews

Upcoming events

Jennie Hale Pottery: Winter Opening at Longham Pottery 25th November to 3rd December, 2017 Showing my latest nature diaries on view, alongside new decorated earthenware and raku.
New Horizons at Joanna Bird Pottery 22nd November to 8th December, 2017 Includes Chris Keenan new work
Open Studio - Sue Mundy at Milking Machine, The 1st - 3rd December 2017 See Sue Mundy in her studio and view new work
Maze Hill Pottery: Christmas Open Studio at Mazehill Pottery 2nd - 3rd December 2017 kilns opening on Saturday at 11.00am. Darren Ellis, and Dominic Upson will also be displaying their work.

Recently added Courses

Adult Summer Pottery Course with Mohamed Hamid - 28th August to 1st September, 2017
Hand building, throwing and decorating techniques! (previous week Fully booked!)
Hand Building & Smoke Firing Course at the Moulin with Frances Marr - 11th - 17th June 2017
Over the the course of the week we will explore smoke-firing techniques resulting from the interaction of clay and fire. 
Residential Pottery Courses in France with Sylph Baier - 14th May to 14th October, 2017
It is mainly throwing based and would suit students with some throwing experience but other techniques can also be covered as well as glazing and firing in electric and gas reduction kiln
Animal Sculpting With Celia Allen - 8th - 10th September 2017
Learn how to sculpt animals of various forms, with a possible Raku firing day to finish

Archive for September, 2013

Marshall Colman: Request for information on the Life of Dora Billington

I am writing a biography of Dora Billington and would be glad to hear from anyone who has any information about her or any of her work in their private collection.

Dora Billington (1890-1968) was one of the most influential people in British studio pottery, particularly because of the potters she taught at the Central School of Arts and Crafts. Among those who studied with her are Gordon Baldwin, Alan Caiger Smith, Nora Braden, Katherine Pleydell-Bouverie, Stella Crofts, Ray Finch, Quentin Bell, Kenneth Clark, Ann Wynn-Reeves, William Newland, Margaret Hine, Nicholas Vergette, James Tower, Ursula Mommens, Helen Pincombe, Gillian Lowndes, Tessa Fuchs and David Queensberry. She was at the Central for almost forty years but the most important period in terms of the impression she made on ceramics was the decade after the second world war, a period of great innovation when studio pottery was threatening to go stale. The new ceramists were taught by Dora Billington when she was in her sixties and, despite her age and old-fashioned appearance, she encouraged young people and was interested in new ideas.

She also contributed to ceramics and the crafts by writing. “The Art of the Potter” related the making of pottery to its historical and artistic context, and “The Technique of Pottery” was at the time the most thorough and well-informed account of ceramic technique for studio potters. She was active in the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society and was on its modernizing wing. She helped to set up the Crafts Centre, a gallery in the centre of London that eventually morphed into the Crafts Council and Contemporary Applied Arts.

Her importance is universally recognized but almost nothing has been written about her. The little that has been published depends on her books and articles and an interview she gave to her colleague John Farleigh for his book “The Creative Craftsman”. She had her own studio and won international prizes for her pottery but most of it is in private hands and is never seen. Her work for the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society is virtually forgotten. In some ways she is an enigma.

How could an influential artist, writer and teacher leave so little trace? The main reason, I think, is that she was a single woman. Although she lectured and published, she did not promote herself aggressively or turn her work into an ideology. There is no archive, no diary and little correspondence. She said that she was interested in pottery almost to the point of obsession but her main activity was teaching. She expressed herself through others; her legacy is in her students and she has left little of herself.

If you have any information, however, slight, do please email me. – Marshall Colman

Email: marshall@marshallcolman.plus.com

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Dora Billington.  (Courtesy of Central St Martins School of Art)

Tobacco jar and cover, glazed earthenware, painted by Dora M. Billington, England, 1923. (Courtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum)

Halima Cassell Catching the Light: sculpture and sculptural ceramics

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Halima Cassell has a particular way of working with clay that almost denies its inherent plasticity when wet and therefore malleable. Instead

KLEI magazine, November 2013 – Emily-Kriste Wilcox

One of the editors of the Dutch ceramic magazine – KLEI,  has written an article focussing on my process of making which will feature in the November issue. Here is a taster exclusively for you – get the magazine for the full article: www.klei.nl

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“The work of Emily-Kriste Wilcox exudes calm and balance.  Soft blue, green and greys predominate.  As a specialist in handbuilding, Emily-Kriste draws inspiration from her rich collection of sketches and photographs that she makes during her travels and walks.(…)  ’Each piece is individual and I approach it in this way.  I find it is vital to have a conversation with each one, focussing my energy and concentration on one piece at a time.  Reflecting and evaluating throughout.  I talk to them – do you need a touch more white here, or perhaps a darker section / strip there?’  And so, each piece is an interpretation of an earlier impression or experience.  A painting in clay……”

Oxford Ceramics Fair – Partnership with the Ashmolean Museum

The Oxford Ceramics Fair is presented by the Craft Potters Association (CPA), now in partnership with the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology. A new initiative by the Ashmolean will see the Museum host a day of ceramic events on 20 October, one week before the Fair.

Ceramics in the City 2013 – A selling fair featuring 50 potters

Thursday 19 September, 6 – 8.30pm (Launch open evening)

Friday 20 September – Sunday 22 September 10am – 5pm

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Admission Free

The Geffrye’s annual celebration of ceramics returns to the museum this September. Featuring around 50 ceramicists from across the UK, the event showcases the work of both leading names and rising talents.