Welcome - This is a Social Enterprise Business It aims to help potters and ceramic artists to become better known, to sell their work, to fill their courses and to provide a window into this fantastic world of 3D art!

New Members

Work for Sale

Ceramics by Regina Heinz at Studiopottery.co.uk

Regina Heinz

Ceramics by Alvin F. Irving at Studiopottery.co.uk

Alvin F. Irving

Upcoming events

Regina Heinz in france at Galerie du Don 7th October to 29th November, 2018 New work from Regina Heinz
Guild Crafts Cheltenham - at Gardens Gallery 5th - 14th October 2018 exhibition of contemporary designer-makers from The Gloucestershire Guild of Craftsmen including Emily-Kriste Wilcox.  Daily demonstrations include bookbinding and calligraphy.
RELIC at Bluecoat Display Centre 29th September to 10th November, 2018 Exhibiting makers include member Rachel Wood
The Great Northern Contemporary Craft Fair at GNCCF 11th - 14th October 2018 mixed fair, plenty of ceramics

Recently added Courses

Regular Pottery Courses by Suleyman Saba - 29th January to 31st December, 2018
Students will learn about preparing clay and different techniques of ceramics from pinch pots and coiled pottery, to slab building and throwing. Students are also guided on aspects of decoration and glazing. 
Lindy Barletta weekday Courses in East Sheen - 1st January to 31st December, 2018
Studio Pottery Making techniques: A terms course covers a project in each - pinching, coiling, slab building and throwing.

Endearing Freaks? The Martin Brothers Potters: 1 Aug – 13 Nov 2016

Martin brothers grotesque bird vessel in the Library at Knightshayes Court, Devon.

Exhibition of ceramics at the National Trust’s Standen House and Garden sees the work of the Martin Brothers in a new light

Eccentric and idiosyncratic, the work of the inimitable Martin Brothers potters (1873 – 1923) has inspired both outright devotion and the raising of eyebrows by critics and collectors. With their distinctive Wally birds, the Martin Brothers have made their mark on the world of antiques, forging their way into the hearts of the British public over Sunday night tea in the Antiques Roadshow.

This mini respective exhibition by the National Trust at Standen, however, takes the debate around these distinctive potters one step further. It proposes that the Martin Brothers were pioneers who shaped the development of British studio pottery.

House Manager, Ben Dale’s enthusiasm is infectious: “the sense of mystery, menacing and intrigue is unmistakable. This exhibition celebrates the work of these remarkable craftsmen, looks at what influenced and inspired them and their impact on the development of Art pottery.” He quotes Bevis Hillier from Malcolm Haslam’s definitive book on the potters: “The Martin Brothers must be considered among the great British artist-craftsmen, not just the endearing freaks they have too often been considered.”

To make the case, the exhibition brings together works from the collection at Standen, with loans from UK collections including the Hull Grundy Collection from Ealing Council (previously at the Pitshanger Museum), the Royal Albert Memorial Museum in Exeter, Holburne Museum in Bath, modern day ceramics by Burslem Pottery and historical pieces owned by the National Trust at Blicking Hall and Greenway, amongst others. The public are asked to respond by stacking their comments on boards above a salvaged potter’s wheel and to enter a theatrically lit display of Wally birds.

The selection of works on show by the Martin Brothers at Standen includes both the recognisable, large scale works, but also smaller, rarely seen vases with intriguing surfaces and glazes. Other works are simply the Martin Brothers at their most esoteric and loveable.

This is a small exhibition but one which captures the brothers’ sense of fearless experimentation. Standen’s curators are not alone in admiring the eccentric Englishness of their output. The exhibition will be opened by David Battie of the Antiques Roadshow, who said:
“After six months as a porter in the ceramics department at Sotheby’s, I still hated pots. Then in came a Martin Brothers Bird Jar – and I was a convert.”
“Trying to fire a stoneware kiln was, at best, risky. When the output resulted in only a few perfect pots, you have a Greek tragedy.”
“Salt-glazed stoneware, whose claim to fame had formally been as sewer pipes, in the hands of the Southall Three was transformed into objects of humour, beauty and utility”.

The Martin Brothers Martin brothers grotesque bird vessel in the Library at Knightshayes Court, Devon. Martin Brothers vase2 photo National Trust Martin Brothers face jug National Trust Martin Brothers crab vase photo National Trust by Martin Brothers
Pictures (from top )Courtesy of: Ealing Council (Wally Bird);National Trust, Andreas von Einsiedel; National Trust;  National Trust; National Trust; National Trust,Horst Kolo

Posted on July 14 2016 under Event Previews, News about Makers, News for Makers.