Welcome - This is a Social Enterprise Business It aims to help potters and ceramic artists to become better known, to sell their work, to fill their courses and to provide a window into this fantastic world of 3D art!

New Members

Work for Sale

Ceramics by Juliet Walters at Studiopottery.co.uk

Juliet Walters

Ceramics by Regina Heinz at Studiopottery.co.uk

Regina Heinz

Upcoming events

Winter Show at Cambridge Contemporary Art 3rd November to 24th December, 2018 featuring work by Adam Frew, David Meredith, McNeill Glass and Helen Martino, Paula Sharples and Jane Kell
Monochrome at Bluecoat Display Centre 17th November to 12th January, 2019 Monochrome is a mixed media exhibition that explores the work of makers who use one colour
Kate Malone in New York at Salon, The, Art + Design 8th - 12th November 2018 Kate Malone, new work
Make '18 - Contemporary Crafts for Christmas at Riverside Gallery, The 17th November to 6th January, 2019 MAKE is Devon Guild's annual Christmas selling exhibition celebrating the diversity of contemporary craft. 

Recently added Courses

Regular Pottery Courses by Suleyman Saba - 29th January to 31st December, 2018
Students will learn about preparing clay and different techniques of ceramics from pinch pots and coiled pottery, to slab building and throwing. Students are also guided on aspects of decoration and glazing. 
Lindy Barletta weekday Courses in East Sheen - 1st January to 31st December, 2018
Studio Pottery Making techniques: A terms course covers a project in each - pinching, coiling, slab building and throwing.

Marshall Colman: Request for information on the Life of Dora Billington

I am writing a biography of Dora Billington and would be glad to hear from anyone who has any information about her or any of her work in their private collection.

Dora Billington (1890-1968) was one of the most influential people in British studio pottery, particularly because of the potters she taught at the Central School of Arts and Crafts. Among those who studied with her are Gordon Baldwin, Alan Caiger Smith, Nora Braden, Katherine Pleydell-Bouverie, Stella Crofts, Ray Finch, Quentin Bell, Kenneth Clark, Ann Wynn-Reeves, William Newland, Margaret Hine, Nicholas Vergette, James Tower, Ursula Mommens, Helen Pincombe, Gillian Lowndes, Tessa Fuchs and David Queensberry. She was at the Central for almost forty years but the most important period in terms of the impression she made on ceramics was the decade after the second world war, a period of great innovation when studio pottery was threatening to go stale. The new ceramists were taught by Dora Billington when she was in her sixties and, despite her age and old-fashioned appearance, she encouraged young people and was interested in new ideas.

She also contributed to ceramics and the crafts by writing. “The Art of the Potter” related the making of pottery to its historical and artistic context, and “The Technique of Pottery” was at the time the most thorough and well-informed account of ceramic technique for studio potters. She was active in the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society and was on its modernizing wing. She helped to set up the Crafts Centre, a gallery in the centre of London that eventually morphed into the Crafts Council and Contemporary Applied Arts.

Her importance is universally recognized but almost nothing has been written about her. The little that has been published depends on her books and articles and an interview she gave to her colleague John Farleigh for his book “The Creative Craftsman”. She had her own studio and won international prizes for her pottery but most of it is in private hands and is never seen. Her work for the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society is virtually forgotten. In some ways she is an enigma.

How could an influential artist, writer and teacher leave so little trace? The main reason, I think, is that she was a single woman. Although she lectured and published, she did not promote herself aggressively or turn her work into an ideology. There is no archive, no diary and little correspondence. She said that she was interested in pottery almost to the point of obsession but her main activity was teaching. She expressed herself through others; her legacy is in her students and she has left little of herself.

If you have any information, however, slight, do please email me. – Marshall Colman

Email: marshall@marshallcolman.plus.com

portrait-from-farliegh-copy2 V&A-2010ED0178

Dora Billington.  (Courtesy of Central St Martins School of Art)

Tobacco jar and cover, glazed earthenware, painted by Dora M. Billington, England, 1923. (Courtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum)


Posted on September 17 2013 under News.