Central St. Martins : Ceramic Art London 2017

Unmissable for all interested in contemporary ceramic art. Ninety of the world's most talented ceramists show and sell their work.

Organised by the Craft Potters Association, this always popular artist-led fair showcases the work of 90 makers in the light-filled atrium of Central Saint Martins. 

Truly international in scope - with exhibitors from the UK, Ireland, Spain, Germany, Denmark, South Korea and Japan - the fair sees the return of renowned makers such as Akiko Hirai, Sophie Cook and James Hake, as well as first-time exhibitors and rising stars including Ben Arnup, Rachel Wood, Silke Decker, Mathew Horne and Lauren Nauman.

For the artists, CAL offers a unique platform to showcase and sell their work. For the public, it presents a compelling snapshot of the global contemporary ceramics market and a rare opportunity to buy unique, handmade pieces directly from the makers. Items on sale range from contemporary twists on functional tableware to sublime sculptural pieces and experimental work that pushes the boundaries of this ancient craft.

With prices ranging from £25 for an exquisite tea cup by Sue Pryke to £8,000 for an original sculpture by Fenella Elms, CAL offers collectors of all budgets the chance to take something home.

Key themes for 2017 

While ceramics have echoed the natural realm for millennia, urban and industrial textures make their mark too with Isobel Egan and Fausto Salvi's ceramic cityscapes. Robert Cooper takes inspiration from urban decay, creating recycled pieces with left-over glazes and ancient pottery shards found on the Thames foreshore. 

Traditional craft mimics virtual reality with Matt Davis' ‘pixelated' porcelain tableware and Ben Arnup's 3-D optical illusions. Ceramics' potential for the playful and even surreal is demonstrated by Yun Wook Mun's melting Dali-esque forms. 

The storytelling capacity of ceramics is powerfully demonstrated by Midori Takaki's eccentric folkloric faces and Jenny Southam's animal and human figures in landscapes. Raewyn Harrison's ‘Mudlarking' and ‘Thames Estuary' series of slip cast, thrown and hand built vessels use Elizabethan illustrations and maps to tell stories of London. 

Makers at this event include (Members in Bold)